Tag Archives: Wall Street

The Way To Wealth: Business & Investing Lessons From a Wall Street Financier

Ziad K Abdelnour latest interview podcast with “Shoulders of Titans ” The Way To Wealth: Business & Investing Lessons From a Wall Street Financier with  Ziad K Abdelnour of www.blackhawkpartners.com..

see interview podcast: www.shouldersoftitans.com/episode/ziad-abdelnour

Thank you.

Becoming Part of the Super Rich Club Running the World

Having been on Wall Street for over 30 years now, and having survived the 1987 crash, the Drexel Burnham bankruptcy, the 1990 credit crunch, the 2000 Internet crash, the real estate meltdown of 2006 and the 2008 Wall Street financial crisis, I think I have learned a thing or two about how to make money, how to survive crises and most importantly how to really thrive and become part of the exclusive Club of 1% when most went buckling.

 

So what specific characteristics do you need to have to be part of that Club?

 

Well… you really have three options:

 

Option 1: You need to love money. You want to say, everybody loves money. Wrong!!! “Everybody” loves spending money – house, cars, food, services, you name it. That can only get you out of the 1%. You need to be sincerely interested to the level of excitement in how money is made, how markets or real estate work, how money grows. You need to get your kick out of making money. Short of that, you won’t get there.

 

Option 2: You need to love power, and to like getting things done. You need to get your kick out of building your empire, out of organizing armies of people. Being psychopath can help, but only to a degree. A psychopath’s lust for human misery would eventually get on the way of effective execution.

 

For More: http://ziadabdelnour.net/becoming-part-of-the-super-rich-club-running-the-world

Increasing Marketshare and Profitability through the Crowd

When crowdfunding and marketplace lending came onto the scene there was little interest from Wall Street in these platforms that were mainly working with undesirable startups and sub-prime borrowers. A few years later crowdfunding has become a true contender, eclipsing angel investments and will soon overtake venture capital as the primary method for funding new businesses.  And now, platform “crowd” finance is beginning to create large dents in both the emerging and growth equity fields.

 

This is a critical opportunity for savvy investment firms to use their existing brand to expand their reach toward new customer bases. Tapping into Main Street accredited investors that want to invest alongside institutional players and expanding access to deal flow.  One such example of this expansion is Goldman Sachs’ entry into the online lending market.

Thank you,

From Lebanese- American Financiers, Differing Views on the Strife

Ziad K. Abdelnour and George F. Boutros have much in common.Born on the same day in Beirut to prominent Christian political families, each left Lebanon to work in the United States in the 1980’s and made a fortune on Wall Street: Mr. Ziad K Abdelnour, as a junk-bond salesman during Michael R.Milken’s glory days at Drexel Burnham Lambert and Mr. Boutros as a top deal maker for Credit Suisse First Boston.

 
But when it comes to the future of their war-torn country, their views diverge sharply.“There is no other way but to absolutely annihilate Hezbollah,” Mr. Abdelnour said. “I bleed when I see my country suffering like this, but you can’t build a Hong Kong and harbor terrorists. The Lebanese cannot have their cake and eat it, too.” Mr. Boutros, while opposed to Hezbollah’s primacy in southern Lebanon, sees the loss of life as unacceptable.

 
“I am appalled and horrified at the killing of innocent people in my country,” he said, his voice shaking with emotion. “The military actions being pursued in Lebanon are not going to stop Hezbollah — they will only make them stronger.”

 

For More: From Lebanese- American Financiers, Differing Views on the Strife

Increasing Marketshare and Profitability through the Crowd—Bringing Main Street to Wall Street

Increasing Marketshare and Profitability through the Crowd—Bringing Main Street to Wall Street – Financial Policy Council

 

Topic: Increasing Marketshare and Profitability through the Crowd—Bringing Main Street to Wall Street

Date: Monday September 14, 2015
Time: 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: The Graduate Center / CUNY at 365 Fifth Avenue at The Elebash Recital Hall – On the main floor of the building and on the left as you enter into the main lobby
When crowdfunding and marketplace lending came onto the scene there was little interest from Wall Street in these platforms that were mainly working with undesirable startups and sub-prime borrowers. A few years later crowdfunding has become a true contender, eclipsing angel investments and will soon overtake venture capital as the primary method for funding new businesses.  And now, platform “crowd” finance is beginning to create large dents in both the emerging and growth equity fields.
This is a critical opportunity for savvy investment firms to use their existing brand to expand their reach toward new customer bases. Tapping into Main Street accredited investors that want to invest alongside institutional players and expanding access to deal flow.  One such example of this expansion is Goldman Sachs’ entry into the online lending market.

One Up on Wall Street: My Favorite Way to Beat the Market – By Mark Skousen

One Up on Wall Street: My Favorite Way to Beat the Market – By Mark Skousen – Financial Policy Council
Thursday, 25 June 2015
6:00 – 9:00 PM

 

Mark Skousen, Ph. D., Editor of Forecasts & Strategies, is a nationally known investment expert, economist, university professor, and author of more than 25 books. Currently Skousen is a Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He recently was named one of the 20 most influential living economists. He earned his Ph. D. in monetary economics at George Washington University in 1977. He has taught economics and finance at Columbia Business School, Columbia University, Grantham University, Barnard College, Mercy College, Rollins College and Chapman University. He also has been a consultant to IBM, Hutchinson Technology and other Fortune 500 companies.

 

Topic: One Up on Wall Street:  My Favorite Way to Beat the Market

Date: Thursday June 25, 2015

Time: 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Location: The Graduate Center / CUNY at 365 Fifth Avenue at The Elebash Recital Hall – On the main floor of the building and on the left as you enter into the main lobby

Registration:

Please register as soon as you can by answering directly to the Board member who invited you as this event is “by invitation” only and as seating is limited.

If not, please go to Donations Page and fill in your full information as a “Supporter” and you will get a confirmation by return Email.

Looking forward to seeing you then and there!

Have a great day.

Will Wall Street ever be fixed?

When it comes to the financial industry, there is a major fallacy that exists: that Wall Street deals only with elite, rich people who deserve to lose their money, and that Mom and Pop are not directly affected by the antics and conflicted practices in the industry.

 

This couldn’t be farther from the truth. Even when Wall Street CEOs are hauled in front of Congress—as Lloyd Blankfein was amid the SEC fraud charges against Goldman Sachs, and as Jamie Dimon was after JPMorgan Chase lost $6 billion on bad trades—they try to make this argument. “We are all big boys.” “We are all sophisticated institutional investors who know exactly what we are doing.”

 
But stop and think about this for a second. Whose money is being played with anyway?

 
Look at just the recent scandals: Who gets affected when a county in Alabama trades a structured derivative with JPMorgan that goes sour, and brings the county closer to bankruptcy? Who gets impacted when a government such as Greece or Italy trades derivatives with Goldman Sachs or JPMorgan to cover up its debt and kick its problems down the road? Who ultimately loses when Morgan Stanley misprices the Facebook IPO and mutual funds lose billions of dollars of retirement and 401(k) savings?

 

For More: Will Wall Street ever be fixed?

 

Thank you.

When Performance Doesn’t Matter

One of the most amusing phrases on Wall Street is “smart money.”

 
This phrase is used to describe the handful of professional investors whose abilities and foresight are thought to be so acute that they spot the big moneymaking opportunities before the average Joe Pro.

 
The smartest of the “smart money” is thought to be hedge funds.

 
A look at recent performance suggests that hedge funds are indeed extremely smart money, though not in the way that most people think.

 
In fact on average, hedge funds are no smarter about picking stocks or other investments than anyone else. In fact, they’re decidedly, startlingly worse.

 
Hedge funds are in fact shutting today at a rate not seen since the financial crisis, as many managers post disappointing returns and an elite group of firms dominate money raising.

 

For More: When Performance Doesn’t Matter

Thank you,